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Hidden Camera Tricks

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Cameras, cameras everywhere. To the left, to the right, above and below. There’s likely a camera pointed at you right this minute, built into your computer. We can hardly get away from the things.
Nowadays, security systems sold at your local electronics outlet can go deep into sci-fi fantasy land and the systems, given they are electronic, are built to as long as you own your home.

Recommended, says Black Hat Security experts and others in the business, are multi-dimensional systems that include night vision monitors, heat detection, motion detection and simply electronic security that alerts local law enforcement when a seal is broken – when a window or door is opened.
The problem is, where do you put all these security gadgets without having visitors in the home feel like they are being examined just by walking into your home?
Depending on your décor, it can be tricky hiding cameras and other sensors, except for the point that electronics companies are also in the business of hiding these gadgets. Some of the ideas already in circulation are downright ingenious.
My old-time favorite was the fake rock in the garden trick – the one made of plastic that had a hidden compartment in it made for stashing a key to your home in case you ever found yourself locked out. But my new favorite is the hidden camera in the doorbell. This is a camera cleverly inserted into a front doorbell apparatus, staring at visitors walking up to your front door without giving itself away.
Sometimes, however, we need real tricks to hiding these monitors and here are a few suggestions:
Forget duplicate coverage
Remember, you don’t need cameras that duplicate coverage. In other words, it is easier to hide one camera than two or three, so keep the system simple.
Shop around – and go small
Look around for companies with cameras already mounted in clever systems – like inside a doorbell – and, if you can’t find cameras in disguise, look for cameras that are small. Small is easier to hide than large. By extension, cameras that swivel are more difficult to hide than cameras that are stationary.
Hide in plain sight
Some heat detectors and motion detectors are somewhat unusual and they come in handsome enough containers that would blend in very well sitting on a shelf next to your home stereo or next to a computer. Nobody needs to know that the extra, sleek looking box near other electronic gear is spying on them.
Places we don’t like
Try hiding a camera behind a garbage can, a dog bed or even a kitty-liter tray. Visitors never go near these things and the camera won’t be offended by its humble location. Using the same logic, make use of cluttered place, like certain shelves in the kitchen. Arrange the items to allow the camera a view of the room.
Carved Out Books
Don’t forget some of the classic hiding places still work. You can find large, old books at garage sales and start carving.
Behind plants
This is a tricky hiding place, because some people are attracted to plants and will go up close to inspect them. On the other hand, when was the last time a guest walked up to a houseplant of yours and actually picked it up? The answer is likely never. In addition, hanging plants are choice hiding places. They are up high, where people seldom look, and they offer a leafy curtain to hide a camera.

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